News & Comment

  • Monday, March 20, 2017
    Rising levels of greenhouse gases, coupled with increasing temperatures and climate change pose a major threat to food systems across the globe. Honorable Dora Siliya, the Minister of Agriculture in Zambia delivered opening remarks at the “Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Sustainability Summit” in Lusaka Zambia, where Local …
  • Friday, March 3, 2017
    Indigenous grains like sorghum and millets hold the potential to improve South African diets and, at the same time, help develop small businesses. That’s according to Professor Gyebi Duodu of the University of Pretoria’s Department of Food Science, who conducts research on healthy foods made from indigenous grains.  “Rapid …
  • Wednesday, February 22, 2017
    From the time that a farmer harvests grain, milks a cow or slaughters a chicken to the time it ends up in a bowl or on a dinner plate, losses may occur. Grain, for example, may be eaten by insect pests while it is being stored. Fruit, vegetables and meat, meanwhile, may spoil if they are not kept cold enough during transport. This is a problem …
  • Wednesday, February 15, 2017
    Reducing food losses and waste can contribute to efforts to alleviate world hunger. Food is lost at each step of the “food supply chain”. Loses occur during production, harvesting, handling, storage, processing, distribution and even during consumption. A study funded by the DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Food Security has identified …
  • Monday, February 13, 2017
    One of the biggest obstacles to sustainable agriculture in South Africa today, is the large amount of organic waste produced by farms. Re-using this carbon- and nutrient-rich waste to benefit plants and animals instead of polluting rivers, could contribute to efforts to make agriculture sustainable. Dr. Elmi Lötze of Stellenbosch University …
  • Wednesday, February 8, 2017
    Many of South Africa’s rural and urban communities are exposed to contaminated water, so say researchers affiliated to the DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Food Security. The cause? Organic, inorganic and microbiological pollutants found in water used for drinking and irrigation in rural communities, and in river pollution caused by partially …
  • Tuesday, February 7, 2017
    Welcome address: Inaugural Conference,  Young African Researchers in Agriculture Network, 6 February 2017, Ocean Breeze Hotel, Strand. It is my pleasure to welcome all of you today to the inaugural conference of theYoung African Researchers in Agriculture network. In particular, I would like to welcome all our guests and …
  • Monday, February 6, 2017
    South Africa’s planned sugar tax has come under severe scrutiny from its parliamentarians. The questions they’re grappling with are whether the country needs a tax and how effective it will be. The tax is planned to take effect on April 1 2017. It’s designed to reduce sugar intake from sugar-sweetened beverages by upping the …
  • Thursday, February 2, 2017
    A study funded by the Centre of Excellence in Food Security has revealed that most South Africans consume high-energy but nutrient poor foods. Professor Hettie Schönfeldt of the University of Pretoria, together with colleagues from the University of Cape Town and the Human Sciences Research Council, conducted a review of all dietary studies, …
  • Tuesday, January 31, 2017
    Researchers, policymakers, NGOs and activists met at the Food and Nutrition Security Indaba hosted by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Organised under the theme: “Attaining food and nutrition security for all, a multi- …