EVENT

Does Africa need a Green Revolution?

Time: 10h00
Venue: University of Pretoria, Hatfield Campus, Library Auditorium, Merensky 2 Library

The DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Food Security and the Agricultural Research Council invite you to a distinguished lecture presented by Prof Louise Fresco, President of Wageningen University and Research (WUR).

Prof Louise Fresco has been President of Wageningen University & Research in The Netherlands since July 2014. She combines a long academic career as professor in Wageningen and Amsterdam and various visiting professorships, with an extensive involvement in policy and development. She is a member of the Dutch Royal Academy of Sciences and of four foreign Academies, as well as former Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Academy of Sciences of South Africa (ASSAf).

She served for nearly ten years as Assistant-Director General at the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN and has spent extensive periods in Africa, Asia and Latin America. She was requested in 2014 by the Trilateral EU Commission to chair the evaluation of the Seventh Framework Programme for Research. She is the recipient of two national prizes – Comenius and Groeneveld – for her work.

Prof Fresco serves as a non-executive director of Unilever, was a member of the Supervisory Board of Rabobank and of the Socio-Economic Council, the highest advisory body in The Netherlands. She serves on the adjudication panel of the World Food Prize.

Upcoming Events

Towards decolonial transdisciplinary research: The humanities in food studies
Date: November 21, 2019

“The humanities in food studies” is a mini-conference hosted by the Critical Food Studies Programme: Transdisciplinary Humanities Approaches

The Future of Farm Workers in South Africa – National Conference
Dates: October 16, 2019 - October 18, 2019
Venue: University of the Western Cape

Farm workers are an integral component of the economy and the food system in South Africa. Yet they are invariably poor, food insecure, marginalised and vulnerable to exploitation. Pro-farm worker legislation since 1994 has provided some protection, but it has also been associated with violations of labour rights and an accelerating pace of evictions and casualisation. Moreover, because agricultural employment is concentrated at specific times of year, seasonal farm workers face an under-reported crisis of underemployment and seasonal hunger.